Tag Archives: women

Help a Sister Out (Every Day)

Lift Each Other Up - Hannah Hart Beat

It’s mesmerizing. Right, Hart Beat? One of my favorite artists Libby Vander Ploeg, who has worked with Food52 in the past, published this PSA for International Women’s Day called “Life Each Other Up” earlier this month. Now in the days of social media these small(ish?) holidays are everywhere and I usually just pass them by. National Donut Day! National Hug a Friend Day! National you have a sibling day who cares we all have siblings day. They can be a bit much. Also, if every day is a holiday of some kind then they never seem special.

International Women’s Day though, it got me thinking. With everything shitty going on in the world, not to mention all the fear mongering and general hate happening in this country, it was nice to have a day where I was seeing all my favorite ladies being celebrated. From bloggers, to celebrities, to politicians, everyone was preaching wise words that they have heard from a women. So much love was spread.

The day got me thinking about how we should think about women and the roll we’ve all played in each other lives every day. And, even more than that, that we’ve got to lift each other up everyday. Because if we don’t, who will? That’s why I’m in love with this gif and am in love with you Hart Beat. As a belated International Women’s Day, here are a few posts I’ve published in the past waxing love for women everywhere.

Happy reading, Hart Beat!! And happy everydayshouldbewomens day!

Hannah Hart Beat - OKreal

OKREAL Talk & Life Advice

Hannah Hart Beat - Hey OK Real

Evening, Hart Beat. Have you heard about OKREAL? I can’t remember how exactly I came across the site but it’s one that I’ve wanted to share with you for a while. I mean, who doesn’t love inspirational quotes like the one above of this one below?

Hannah Hart Beat - Hey OK Real

 

 

OKREAL is a site that pulls quotes, articles and advice from women working in creative fields. From the time that I’ve followed their Instagram account they have interviewed Ann Friedman (LURV HER), Rachael Yaeger and Joy Bryant among others. Aside from original interviews and articles, the site also pulls inspirational pieces by writes that we all know and love. One of my favorites was this speech written by my role model Mary Karr.

Not only does the OKREAL website have a treasure trove of life advice, baller women inspiration and general MHM HELL YEA moments but they also have a great Instagram account that brings these three feelings into your feed when you’re on the go.

Hannah Hart Beat - Hey OK Real

Hannah Hart Beat - Hey OK Real

Hannah Hart Beat - Hey OK Real

Hannah Hart Beat - Hey OK Real

Hannah Hart Beat - Hey OK Real

Hannah Hart Beat - Hey OK Real

All quotes and images via OKREAL.

Need other inspiration, got another post right here waiting for you.

 

Reese Witherspoon preaching feminism 🙌

Hannah Hart Beat

Hey Hart Beat! It’s lunch time so I thought I would share some reading for you if you’re looking for that kind of thing right now. Last night on Facebook I came across Reese Witherspoon’s acceptance speech for Glamour Women of the Year Award. I’ve been a long time fan of Reese and this speech made me love her even more. I admire so much her attitude and her advocation for ambitious women. One of the main points that Reese makes is, in this world dominated by men, if you see somewhere where you think you can add benefit, do it! Don’t wait for someone else to create the world for you. Anyway, here’s the whole speech if you’re interested. I hope you find it as inspiring as I did, Hart Beat.

I can’t thank Glamour magazine enough and Conde Nast and Cindi for asking me to be here. You just made this night so amazing. These incredible, inspiring women are doing so many things to change how we perceive women, and I hope Amy Schumer and all the other nominees that when you consider making your biopic, you’ll give me the rights first, which would be great. Although Amy, I’ll have to play your grandmother in the movie (by Hollywood standards), and you’ll probably have to play your own mother.

I’m so excited that so many young women are here tonight. This all started for me when I was a little girl. I was 14 years old when I learned that I love acting, and I still do. Acting allows me to slip into the skin of all kinds of different women, and not in a creepy “Silence of the Lambs” way…but in a way that lets me explore the full spectrum of humanity. Every woman I’ve ever played is passionate and strong and flawed, except for Tracy Flick. She’s 100 percent perfect, but she made me say that. But I also learned at 14 years old that I was ambitious. Really ambitious. Did I say that out loud? Let’s talk about ambition.

I want everybody to close their eyes and think of a dirty word, like a really dirty word. Now open your eyes. Was any of your words ambition? I didn’t think so. See, I just kind of started wondering lately why female ambition is a trait that people are so afraid of. Why do people have prejudiced opinions about women who accomplish things? Why is that perceived as a negative? In a study by Georgetown University in 2005, a group of professors asked candidates to evaluate male ambition vs. female ambition in politicians. Respondents were less likely to vote for power-seeking women than power-seeking men. They also perceived ambitious women as looking out for themselves. They even reported ambitious women as provoking feelings of disgust.

Now, in my life I have always found more comfort in being the underdog. Whether people thought I couldn’t do something or they said it was impossible, I always rose to the challenge. I enjoyed reaching for the impossible. I remember when I was 18 years old and applying to colleges, I had this male college counselor, and he said, “Don’t even bother applying to Stanford, sweetie. Your SAT scores aren’t good enough.” But I did it anyway, and I got in. (But it wasn’t because of my SAT scores!)

When I got into the film business, I was doing dramas, and casting directors didn’t know if I could be funny. So I did a comedy, “Legally Blonde,” and then my entire career I was pigeonholed. I did comedies, they didn’t think I was serious. I did dramas, they didn’t think I was funny. And I got older and they didn’t think I could still be viable. So about three years ago, I found myself very curious about the state of the movie business. I really wondered how the digital evolution was affecting the landscape of filmmaking and specifically why studios were making fewer and fewer movies. So I started asking questions, and I decided to meet with the heads of each of the different movie studios that I had been friends with for years and I had made many movies with them. Each of the meetings started with something very casual like, “How are your kids?” and “Wow, has it really been that long since ‘Walk the Line’?” At the end of the meeting, I sort of casually brought up, “So, how many movies are in development with a female lead?” And by lead, I don’t mean wife of the lead or the girlfriend of the lead. The lead, the hero of the story. I was met with nothing, blank stares, excessive blinking, uncomfortable shifting. No one wanted to answer the question because the fact was the studios weren’t developing anything starring a woman. The only studio that was was turning a man’s role into a woman’s role. And the studio heads didn’t apologize. They don’t have to apologize. They are interested in profits — and after all, they run subsidiary companies of giant corporations.

But I was flabbergasted. This was 2012, and it made no sense to me. Where was our Sally Field in “Norma Rae” or Sigourney Weaver in “Alien” or Goldie Hawn in, you name it, any Goldie Hawn movie: “Overboard,” “Wildcats,” “Private Benjamin”? These women shaped my idea of what it meant to be a woman of strength and character and humor in this world. And my beautiful, intelligent daughter, who is 16 years old now, would not grow up idolizing that same group of women. Instead, she’d be forced to watch a chorus of talented, accomplished women Saran wrapped into tight leather pants, tottering along on very cute, but completely impractical, shoes turn to a male lead and ask breathlessly, “What do we do now?!” Seriously, I’m not kidding. Go back and watch any movie, and you’ll see this line over and over. I love to ask questions, but it’s my most hated question.

I dread reading scripts that have no women involved in their creation because inevitably I get to that part where the girl turns to the guy, and she says, “What do we do now?!” Do you know any woman in any crisis situation who has absolutely no idea what to do? I mean, don’t they tell people in crisis, even children, “If you’re in trouble, talk to a woman.” It’s ridiculous that a woman wouldn’t know what to do.

So, anyway, after going to these studios and telling people about how there’s barely any female leads in films and the industry’s in crisis, people were aghast. “That’s horrible,” they said. And then they changed the subject and moved on with their dinner and moved on with their lives. But I could not change the subject. I couldn’t turn to some man and say, “What do we do now?” This is my life.

I’ve made movies all my life, for 25 years, since I was 14 years old. It was time to turn to myself and say, “OK, Reese, what are we going to do now?” The answer was very clear. My mother, who is here tonight, a very strong, smart Southern woman, said to me, “If you want something done, honey, do it yourself.”

So, I started my own production company, Pacific Standard Films, with the mission to tell stories about women. And I was nervous, y’all. I was spending my own money, which everyone in the movie business always tells you, “Don’t spend your own money on anything.” I was warned that on the crazy chance Pacific Standard would acquire any good scripts we would never make it past our first few years in business because there just wasn’t a market for buying female-driven material. But like Elle Woods, I do not like to be underestimated.

I’m a very avid reader. In fact, I’m a complete book nerd. So is my producing partner, so we tore through tons of manuscripts and read so many things before they were published, but we could only find two pieces of material that we thought were right. We optioned them with our own money, and we prayed that they would work. Both had strong, complicated, fascinating women at the center and both were written by women. And lo and behold, both books hit number one on the New York Times bestsellers list. One is called “Gone Girl” and the second is called “Wild.” So we made those two films last year, and those two films rose to over half a billion dollars world wide and we got three Academy Award nominations for women in acting performances. So that is year one. Against the odds, Pacific Standard has had a year two and year three. We bought five more bestselling books. Next year, we’re going to make two of those, “Big Little Lies” and “Luckiest Girl Alive,” into films. We have over 25 films in development and three television shows, and they all have female leads of different ages and different races and different jobs. Some are astronauts, some are soldiers, some are scientists, one is even a Supreme Court justice. They’re not just good or bad; they’re bold and hunted and dangerous and triumphant like the real women we meet every single day of our lives. But our company isn’t just thriving because it feels like a good thing to do. It’s thriving because female-driven films work. This year alone, “Trainwreck” with Amy Schumer, Melissa McCarthy’s “Spy,” “Pitch Perfect 2,” “Cinderella,” the “Hunger Games” franchise, those made over 2.2 billion dollars world wide. Films with women at the center are not a public service project, they are a big time, bottom line-enhancing, money-making commodity.

I think we are in a culture crisis in every field. In every industry, women are underrepresented and underpaid in leadership positions. Under 5 percent of CEOS of fortune 500 companies are women. Only 19 percent of Congress is women. No wonder we don’t have the health care we deserve or paid family leave or public access to early childhood education. That really worries me. How can we expect legislation or our needs to be served if we don’t have equal representation? So here’s my hope: If you’re in politics, media, the tech industry, or working as an entrepreneur or a teacher or a construction worker or a caregiver, you know the problems we are all facing. I urge each one of you to ask yourselves: What do we do now? That’s a big question. What is it in life that you think you can’t accomplish? Or what is it that people have said that you cannot do? Wouldn’t it feel really good to prove them all wrong? Because I believe ambition is not a dirty word. It’s just believing in yourself and your abilities. Imagine this: What would happen if we were all brave enough to be a little bit more ambitious? I think the world would change.

P.S. Another inspiring feminist that I love talks about her secret to great hair. Hint, the answer is feminism.

Lisa Przystup aka James's Daughter Flowers aka @brass_tacks

Florists, taking over the world

Lisa Przystup aka James's Daughter Flowers aka @brass_tacks

Hi Hart Beat! Sorry for the radio silence this week. Pedro and I came down with a horrible cold over the weekend at my parents so I’ve been lying low. Today I wanted to talk a little bit about a lifestyle craze that I’ve been seeing all over the place.

Have you noticed how big florists have become. They’re everywhere! And it’s not just for weddings anymore, lifestyle flower arraigners are gaining hundreds of thousands of Instagram followers, they’re collaborating with big brands and blogs like Madewell and Garance Doré, using services like upleap.com, and they’re quickly becoming the new fashion blogger or baker of the moment.

It’s all for very good reason though. Flower arranging in a beautiful way is a skill, it’s not something that just anyone can do successful (ahem yours truly cannot successfully make anything beautiful out of green things). So, in the spirit of this new craze, here are a few florists that I’ve been following lately.

Lisa Przystup aka James’s Daughter Flowers aka @brass_tacks

Lisa Przystup aka James's Daughter Flowers aka @brass_tacks

Hannah Hart Beat

Lisa Przystup aka James's Daughter Flowers aka @brass_tacks

Amy Merrick aka Amy Merrick Flowers and Styling aka @amy_merrick

Amy Merrick aka Amy Merrick Flowers and Styling aka @amy_merrick

Amy Merrick aka Amy Merrick Flowers and Styling aka @amy_merrick

Amy Merrick aka Amy Merrick Flowers and Styling aka @amy_merrick

Kelli Galloway aka Hops Petunia aka @hopspetunia

Kelli Galloway aka Hops Petunia aka @hopspetunia

Kelli Galloway aka Hops Petunia aka @hopspetunia

Kelli Galloway aka Hops Petunia aka @hopspetunia

All photos from the lovely ladies respective Instagram accounts. (Top photo via Amy Merrick.)

 

 

 

 

Alabama Shakes and their new sound

22mag-22shakes.t_CA2-superJumbo

What’s that? Didn’t see you over there Hart Beat since I’m currently focusing on tapping my foot hard to some new amazing music from the Alabama Shakes. If you didn’t know already (shout out to NPR music on this one) our favorite breakout band from 2012 is on the verge of releasing their second studio album Sound & Colors.

In anticipation of the new album release, The New York Times Magazine last week published this in depth interview / price about Brittany Howard the female powerhouse behind the band.
 
The article was an in depth look at the humble origins of the Alabama Shakes and the original chain of events that brought them from a north Alabama barroom band to one of the most hyped indie bands in the last three years. Especially insightful was a conversation with Brittany Howard, the lead singer and songwriter of he band. Brittany’s voice is really one of the things to set the Alabama Shakes apart from the rest of the indie southern bands to be pumped out of SXSW.
 
While I didn’t appreciate the frank disdain for Brittany’s body (what does that have anything to do with her music) I loved hearing how her struggle to find a place in this world influenced her to start a band. It was also immensely refreshing to hear how little success had changed her life and how much just the act of playing can bring XX happiness.
 
Read the entire article “Alabama Shakes Soul-Stirring, Shape Shifting New Sound” and in honor of this wonderful news, here’s one of the singles that the Alabama Shakes released since Boys & Girls came out in 2012.

 



Top photo via the NYT Magazine article.

Los Angeles, let me back in

I can’t believe it but I’ve only just discovered Rkives. If I didn’t love this song so much then I probably wouldn’t be telling you that Hart Beat. Sometimes it’s hard to write about something you love so much, like this song. I feel so nostalgic, sad, happy, and excited at the same time when I hear Jenny Lewis sing this song. Even more, I love this video of collected fan video from Rilo Kiley’s days touring back in the day.
From the Eastern seaboard, the landlocked Midwest
The Keys, the Alps, the Black Hills and Budapest
With my heart in a sling, tail between my legs a-swinging
I’m sorry for leaving
 
But when the palm trees bow their heads
No matter how wrong I’ve been
L.A., you always let me back in


“Let Me Back In” by Rilo Kiley

Los Angeles, let me back in

I can’t believe it but I’ve only just discovered Rkives. If I didn’t love this song so much then I probably wouldn’t be telling you that Hart Beat. Sometimes it’s hard to write about something you love so much, like this song. I feel so nostalgic, sad, happy, and excited at the same time when I hear Jenny Lewis sing this song. Even more, I love this video of collected fan video from Rilo Kiley’s days touring back in the day. 
From the Eastern seaboard, the landlocked Midwest
The Keys, the Alps, the Black Hills and Budapest
With my heart in a sling, tail between my legs a-swinging
I’m sorry for leaving

But when the palm trees bow their heads
No matter how wrong I’ve been
L.A., you always let me back in


“Let Me Back In” by Rilo Kiley

Lily & Madeleine sing for you

Two posts in one night, crazy world Hart Beat. For those that don’t follow my amazing twitter, NPR’s All Songs Considered this week was pretty unbeatable. I honestly can’t wait for the new albums (Cults, The Avett Brothers, Kishi Bashi) to release.

One artist who I hadn’t heard before is now taking over my Spotify play time like it’s October of 2012 and honeyhoney came out with a new album. Anyway, just listen to this track and get excited for the new album, Hart Beat.

If only my feet could fall as fast as a heart does
I would be so long gone
But I’m stuck, stuck under your thumb
I can’t get up
I can’t get up, I can’t get up

Lily & Madeleine sing “Back to the River”

PS. The harmonizing in this song remind me of this amazing cover.
Call your girlfriend.

Traveling alone

I love traveling. What a surprise! And as probably a couple of you could guess, I had a minor freak out after I signed my year lease realizing that it meant I might not be traveling abroad or in the country any time soon. After coming back from Europe in July I read this article online talking about how important it is for women, especially, to travel alone. Traveling is such a liberating experience and can really help you conquer your fears and also remind you how strong you really are. Of course, that doesn’t mean ignore safety or be oblivious to your surroundings. For example, I’m thinking of heading to Osaka soon. I will be researching how to get around Osaka other things like that so that I’m prepared for the environment thatll I’ll be in. I was always was terrified of traveling alone but after doing it when C. went home I realized how much I love it. However, traveling alone can help you learn so many important life lessons, and at some point you may be forced to travel solo. But this experience can be so educational due to having complete responsibility over your own actions and choices. For example, if you are traveling from Bangkok to Phuket, it is down to you to organise and orchestrate this course of action. Not your parents! Many people find that they have to travel solo when they study abroad, which is a much more common occurrence nowadays thanks to cultural exchange programs. While I was in Europe, I met someone that spent most of their time in America studying, and she told me that she was a Cultural Care Au Pair in the U.S. Now I thought traveling alone gave me some life skills, but how about traveling alone to study in a foreign country, while also being a child carer to make some money on the side? Now those are life skills.


Traveling alone

I love traveling. What a surprise! And as probably a couple of you could guess, I had a minor freak out after I signed my year lease realizing that it meant I might not be traveling abroad or in the country any time soon. After coming back from Europe in July I read this article online talking about how important it is for women, especially, to travel alone. I always was terrified of traveling alone but after doing it when C. went home I realized how much I love it. What about you? Ever traveled alone before?